So you’re the biggest, friendliest, most exotic, most democratic, most aristocratic company selling the nicest, brightest, darkest, blackest, tastiest, nastiest, most effective, most stylish product in the fastest, loudest, most innovative, most unobtrusive, most traditional way. But are you the most popular company?

Well, I came across an advertisement of one company which claimed to be the most popular in its category. And if I’m not mistaken, the category is not a niche one either.

So how come if you’re the most popular company in your category, you need to advertise, and advertise that you’re the most popular, while I already know your competitor and I read your name for the first time in that advertisement of yours.

Bottomline is: do you think long and hard enough before framing and publishing your marketing communication? Does it make sense to you? Would it make sense to anyone who’s reading it? Don’t give me the faff about TG here – if your message is out there, it will be read, analyzed, criticized and ripped apart by anyone who sees it. Are you prepared for that?

2 thoughts on “Most popular

  1. Hmm.. interesting point.. But I have few reservations 😀
    I think companies brag about “best selling lather maker ever” or “most popular motion picture” for the same reason you and me buy the best sellers from Amazon or the neighborhood pan shop. We all love to have the best, well thats a far fetched generalization, but you know deep down that you would like to have the best no matter what. But how you will what is best, unless a marketer gets on rooftop start shouting?

    We could argue that customer is intelligent enough to findout what is best, but my dear, we are not that smart and there are just too many categories of things we want that we hardly care to do that research ourself. Even if we are smart enough to find out the best ourselves the best (like we do for that shiny new digital slr or graphics memory card) we often dont bother to do the same for stuff like bath soaps, sodas, news papers, coffee and so much of other stuff, where we spend atleast 80% of our money. This is exactly what the marketer is targeting by shouting that they have the best in that product category for you.

    It could get confusing when competing brands shout messages or use their own benchmarks to figure out the best… but then again… the more noise is out there, things like “repetition of message”, “quality of the product”, “wom” will come in to picture…

    But you have cornered an excellent point though… it would be nice to read this blog along with some example brands though 🙂

  2. Agreed to all of that. But would you want to deal with a company that claims to be not the fastest, or selling the best product, but the most *popular* company?

    I know some people who do that (hint hint: Canon fans :D), but even they’d deny that they’re buying because it’s the most *popular*.

    Now for the point I was trying to make with the post: what would you feel for an ad by some company called, say, Patel Optics, claiming that they are the most popular camera maker in the world?

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